Marvella (New York, USA) Double Strand Choker Necklace with Brown Faceted Auroral Borealis Beads

$ 30.00

An Aurora Borealis choker necklace featuring brown polychromatic faceted crystal beads interspersed with tiny spacer beads strung onto a graduated double strand necklace from Marvella.  The necklace is affixed with a gold tone hook clasp and chain set with a single accent rhinestone and measures 15 1/2" long at the shortest strand and 16 1/2" long at the longest strand.  The back of the hook clasp is signed "Marvella" and the condition is very good.

Necklace Sizing

To measure the best necklace size for you, take a tape measure and wrap around your neck to get its circumference.  Take that number and add 2" to 4" to determine the best minimum necklace length for you.  For a regular necklace, choose the second size up from your neck size as a minimum.  For example, if your neck measures 15" around, the minimum necklace size you should choose would be 17" to 19".  If you want a choker, stick with your exact neck measurement for the necklace size.  Standard necklaces sizes, common to most people, come in the following sizes:

  • 14" to 16" is a standard choker length
  • 16" to 19" falls just below the throat at the collarbone
  • 20" falls slightly below the collarbone and is a good choice for low necklines
  • 22" falls at or just above the neckline
  • 24" falls below the neckline
  • 36" can be worn as a long single opera length or doubled up
  • Children's necklaces are usually between 14" to 16"

A Brief History of Aurora Borealis Crystal

Aurora Borealis crystal had its glamorous start in the 1950s when Manfred Swarovsky, son of founder Daniel Swarovsky, teamed up with fashion designer Christian Dior to create exceptional jewelry to go with his revolutionary New Look fashions.  The process of creating the Aurora Borealis effect was inspired by Swarovsky's prior utilitarian application of coating optical lenses with blue metallic coating.  Manfred decided to experiment using this application on cut crystal beads by spraying them with micro-layers of metal and then vaporizing the finish in a vacuum.  The result was shimmering beads that reflected a rainbow of luminescent colors.  The beads came to be known by its trade name, Aurora Borealis, in homage to the charged, dancing ethereal colors of the Northern Lights.

Source:  Swarovski


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